487954_2108529352508_237997211_nIt has been over a year since my last post, partially because I was busy with PhD stuff, football, traveling, etc. Actually the real reason is probably because I was just not inspired to write anything in particular about. But in an effort to avoid doing any PhD work, I decided to write a new post, and the more I thought about what to write, and what I haven’t written yet, the more it made sense to write about something other than just which place has the best coffee, or how to make it. I wanted to write about what coffee means to me, and found out that while the taste of the coffee is very important, at the end of the day, it is about so much more than that.

I started drinking coffee when I was 13, and almost just as many years later, I’ve come to gather a great number of good and bad stories/memories involving coffee…could definitely have enough for a whole book (Note to self: if the whole law thing doesn’t work out, good idea for an actual book!). It’s true to say that coffee has in many countries become in a way a synonym for socializing. We invite someone for coffee not for the sole purpose of drinking coffee, but most often to catch up on things if we haven’t seen a person for a long period of time, or to get to know the person, if we’ve only just met them. In such cases, coffee becomes a secondary matter.

However, it is true that the coffee drinking culture is different in most countries of the world. Italians for example drink their coffee, usually an espresso, fairly quickly and go about their day, whereas we Slovenians like to take our time. And don’t get me started about the US, where the “to-go” culture is predominant.

Anyhow, so I don’t write a whole chapter here…

I still remember my first coffee,..I was 13, coming back on vacation to Slovenia for the first time after moving overseas, and met up with my former classmates to tell them what the US was like. There was four or five of us around a table at Berry café in Ljubljana, and I ordered the coffee solely because everyone else did..peer pressure I know. But anyways, the taste wasn’t anything special, in fact it was quite bad. But that’s how it started…

I remember having a chat over coffee about slovenian music and how much it means to slovenians living abroad with a famous slovenian musician, Vlado Kreslin, at the Slovenian Embassy in Washington DC…

I also remember last summer in Kenya when one morning at about 5am before leaving our camp to go back to Nairobi, myself, my sister and a Croatian guy (Damir) wanted a much stronger coffee than we usually got, so while Damir kept eye out for the cook, I sneaked in and doubled the usual dose of the coffee used for breakfast. It was still a bit weak, but that’s besides the point…

I guess the point is that while I do reallyyy enjoy a great cup of coffee, be it espresso, cappuccino or whatever, perhaps more importantly I enjoy the great memories and stories that sometimes come with the coffee drinking. And perhaps that’s why I like drinking coffee so much…

Anyways, I have tons of other stories and memories I could spend hours talking about. Feel free to share some of yours as well. 🙂

 Random coffee story: Apparently Voltaire used to drink 50 cups of coffee a day.

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